And yet the same old forms of racism, gender norms and stereotyping are no less persistent., Aziz Ansari's Netflix original series, which released its second season Friday, depicts the struggles involved in finding love, online and off, in a way most other mainstream shows are seemingly incapable of.The standup comic and author provides real-life scenarios of romance without Hollywood's typical whitewashing: from exploring fetishization associated with dating people of a certain skin color and ethnicity to portraying what it's like rejecting an English-speaking man through the muted perspective of a female cashier who only speaks American Sign Language.

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In fact, according to a spokesperson from the dating app Hinge, women are 40% more likely to respond to openers about food.

So, in theory, asking a woman a question about Whole Foods isn't a bad place to start. "It's funny and got people's attention because it's almost the quintessential millennial hipster line," says Erin Sumner, Ph D, an assistant professor at Trinity University who studies online dating.

Related: Elisabeth Moss, 'The Handmaid's Tale' and the power of celebrities in scientology Ansari goes on a round of first dates in the second season's fourth episode (properly titled "First Date"), offering a glimpse into what it’s like being single in New York City in 2017 while on dating apps as a South Asian man amid a variety of ethnically diverse women.

The conversations are candid, hysterical, sometimes awkward and always accurate in their representations of today's culture and racial relations."Oh, being a black woman on these apps?

The reason why it works isn't just a testament to Whole Foods' broad appeal; it's actually kind of brilliant.

Unlike a generic greeting, this question requires a response or, at the very least, a "haha." It's also assertive and skips over the small talk, so you can get right to the part where you make plans together, says Samantha Burns, LMHC, a relationship counselor and dating consultant.

"We know that the places we live and hang are often segregated by race and class. "And the groups that face the most discrimination, African-American women and Asian men..are pretty far from equality online."Despite the obvious flaws in the apps many people use to determine who they meet in their lives, the issue isn’t typically showcased on TV or the silver screen.

There’s an "epidemic of invisibility" throughout Hollywood, according to a diversity study on film and television released last year by the Media, Diversity and Social Change Initiative at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

"Vegetarian," "grad school," or even the word "zombie" have a higher response rate than the average message, she says. Sumner suggests personalizing it, like, "Saw this ice cream at Whole Foods and remembered that it was your favorite. "Chatting a match for the first time can be stressful, so it's refreshing the way this lighthearted message cuts through any potential awkwardness.